Monthly Posts · To Read

March ’20 | To Read

February’s reading was so successful, it gave me so much more confidence on this blog, that I can’t help but continue my system. This year has already been such a huge boost from last year, managing to keep way ahead of my Goodreads Reading Goal. Plus, we have a few extra days this month, so I’m hoping to read a lot more!


1. Solitaire by Alice Oseman 
In case you’re wondering, this is not a love story.
My name is Tori Spring. I like to sleep and I like to blog. Last year – before all that stuff with Charlie and before I had to face the harsh realities of A-Levels and university applications and the fact that one day I really will have to start talking to people – I had friends. Things were very different, I guess, but that’s all over now.
Now there’s Solitaire. And Michael Holden.
I don’t know what Solitaire are trying to do, and I don’t care about Michael Holden.
I really don’t.


2. Kill [redacted] by Anthony Good
Michael lost his wife in a terrorist attack on a London train. Since then, he has been seeing a therapist to help him come to terms with his grief – and his anger. He can’t get over the fact that the man he holds responsible has seemingly got away scot-free. He doesn’t blame the bombers, who he considers only as the logical conclusion to a long chain of events. No, to Michael’s mind, the ultimate cause is the politician whose cynical policies have had such deadly impact abroad. His therapist suggests that he write his feelings down to help him forgive and move on, but as a retired headteacher, Michael believes that for every crime there should be a fitting punishment – and so in the pages of his diary he begins to set out the case for, and set about committing, murder.


3. The Babysitters Coven by Kate Williams 
Seventeen-year-old Esme Pearl has a babysitters club. She knows it’s kinda lame, but what else is she supposed to do? Get a job? Gross. Besides, Esme likes babysitting, and she’s good at it.
And lately Esme needs all the cash she can get, because it seems like destruction follows her wherever she goes. Let’s just say she owes some people a new tree.
Enter Cassandra Heaven. She’s Instagram-model hot, dresses like she found her clothes in a dumpster, and has a rebellious streak as gnarly as the cafeteria food. So why is Cassandra willing to do anything, even take on a potty-training two-year-old, to join Esme’s babysitters club?
The answer lies in a mysterious note Cassandra’s mother left her: “Find the babysitters. Love, Mom.”
Turns out, Esme and Cassandra have more in common than they think, and they’re about to discover what being a babysitter really means: a heroic lineage of superpowers, magic rituals, and saving the innocent from seriously terrifying evil. And all before the parents get home.


On my Netgalley Shelf:

  • A Strangely Wrapped Gift by Emily Juniper

In my Audible Library:

  • Romeo and Jude by Marty Ross (5h 45m) 
  • Geography Club by Brent Hartinger (5h 9m)
  • Egghead: Or, You Can’t Survive on Ideas Alone by Bo Burnham (1h 23m)
  • American Panda by Gloria Chao (7h 32m)
  • Damaged Like Us by Krista and Becca Ritchie (10h 27m)
  • My Week With Marilyn by Colin Clark (3h 25m)
  • The Child: An Audible Drama by Sebastian Fitzek (6h 55m) 
  • Slated by Teri Terry (10h 17m) 
  • Skulduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy (7h 9m)
  • Serpent & Dove by Shelby Mahurin (14h 13m) 
  • The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith (15h 53m)

To Review on Readers First:

  • Killer T by Robert Muchamore
  • Kill [redacted] by Anthony Good

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